Lisa L. JohnsonAttorney at law
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Divorce And Family Law Issues

October 2017 Archives

Prenuptial agreements can deal with more than property division

Reportedly, more and more couples nationwide are signing prenuptial agreements, including in Kentucky. However, many misconceptions exist about marriage agreements, the most common being that they are only used to protect spouses in property division situations in the events of divorces. The truth is that a prenup can deal with many matters and is typically used to set up a framework that will deal with any disputes that might arise. It may even include issues such as gambling, overspending, infidelity, substance abuse and more.

High asset divorce of Herjavec revisited after revealing letter

People in Kentucky may be aware that, since the turn of the eighteenth century, it has been said that hell hath no fury like a woman scorned. Any spouse in a high asset divorce who tries to hide his or her riches may do well to remember that phrase. The 55-year-old reality TV star, Robert Herjavec, of Shark Tank fame, who got divorced in March 2015, might be called back to court on allegations that he misrepresented his company's worth at that time.

What is considered when applying for grandparents' rights

Laws determining visitation rights for grandparents differ from state to state. In Kentucky, laws governing grandparents' rights have not been changed or revised since 1996. However, the interpretation and administration of the existing laws have been impacted by case law over the years. As a result, Kentucky is classified as "permissive" with regard to grandparents' visitation.

Child custody matters to consider when a parent relocates

Families in Kentucky relocate all the time for various reasons. However, when a divorced parent needs to move away to benefit from family support in another location, an employment opportunity or a remarriage, child custody issues can complicate such plans considerably. Invariably, parents who cannot agree on these matters will likely wind up in court.

Property division and a manipulating, business-owning spouse

When a Kentucky divorce involves one spouse who owns a business, the manner in which that person conducts business during that time becomes a matter of vital importance. It is not uncommon for spouses to manipulate finances to benefit themselves when it comes to property division. The other spouse might want to look out for tell-tale signs of such financial deceit.

Post-divorce mediation can resolve disputes arising from judgment

Many Kentucky couples have saved money and time by reaching settlement agreements out of court. Divorce mediation may have become the preferred option for couples who want to avoid courtrooms where one will typically be the loser. However, there is no guarantee that disputes will not arise in the years following a divorce -- particularly if there are growing children to consider.

Divorce mediation might even resolve high-conflict divorces

While divorce in Kentucky is typically a complicated process for any couple, some can be more challenging than others -- particularly if one of the spouses is a narcissist. When divorcing a high-conflict personality, all the avenues for peaceful negotiation and divorce mediation might not be easy to navigate. The word sometimes used to describe a divorce in such circumstances is toxic.

Prime ways to save money during a divorce

Even with an improving economy, it is more important than ever for divorcing parties to think critically about how they spend money in dissolving their unions. Most people already know that divorce can be expensive, especially when children are involved. So those motions you want to file to keep your ex-spouse honest could have a significant effect on your ability to maintain a decent standard of living for you and your children.

Grandparents' rights nonexistent in guardianship

Over 2.6 million grandparents nationwide, including in Kentucky, have taken on the responsibility of raising their grandchildren. A government executive said the heroin and opioid epidemic that is sweeping the country puts enormous pressure on grandparents who want to make sure their grandchildren stay out of the foster system. Sadly, compared to the foster system, grandparents' rights to subsidies for guardianship are nonexistent.