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Not every Kentucky couple can work together after a divorce. Sometimes, the anger and hurt remain so strong that the parties have a difficult time being in the same room together even though they recognize that the children need to spend as much time with each of them as possible. In these cases, parallel parenting may provide a way through these challenges.

Unlike co-parenting, which requires a great deal of cooperation and communication between the parents, parallel parenting allows the parties to spend a significant amount of time with the children while limiting the contact between parents. This method of post-divorce parenting may allow Kentucky parents to limit the conflicts and tension that arises anytime they are in the same space. It would certainly benefit the children.

A strict parenting plan is created that often includes neutral drop-off points and each parent must adhere to the schedule. Any changes must be preapproved through the agreed-upon method of communication, which ordinarily occurs through email or fax. Communications are limited to issues concerning the children. Each parent chooses how to spend his or her time with the children, but a set of general rules for each household may be included regarding issues such as homework, bedtimes other activities that require consistency for the children.

These are just some of the advantages of parallel parenting. Other issues may also be addressed such as talking about the other parent in front of the children, dealing with school or extracurricular activities and other occasions where both parents may want to be present. In some cases, the parents may be able to negotiate this type of parenting agreement, but in many cases, a third party such as a judge, an evaluator or a parent coordinator will create the plan depending on the circumstances.